A person talking on the phone is ready to tell the IRS he is closing his business

Tell the IRS and Other Tax Agencies That You’re Closing Your Business

Once you’ve decided to dissolve your company, tell the IRS and your state and local tax agencies your plans for closing your business. Take this step immediately after making a decision to close. This will provide you with the time you need to work through IRS and other tax agencies’ requirements for closure.

Is your business a corporation? If so, you'll need to file Form 966, Corporate Dissolution or Liquidation with the IRS within 30 days of filing your articles of dissolution. A tax attorney can help you complete this form.

Would you like to connect with an attorney? Click the Connect button below to get started.

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Every state requires businesses that have registered to collect and pay sales taxes to notify its tax authority about their dissolution. Some states could also ask you to obtain a tax clearance, consent to dissolution, or verification of good standing from your state’s tax agency before allowing you to dissolve your business. Most often, these requirements exist for corporations or limited liability companies (LLC) and can be attained by as long as your business is current on its state tax obligations.

If you are registered to collect and pay sales taxes in multiple states, you will need to contact each state’s tax agency to learn the steps you’ll need to follow. The phone number and website for each state are provided below:

Alabama

(334) 242-9600

Hawaii

(800) 222-3229

Massachusetts

(617) 887-6367

New Mexico

(505) 827-0700

South Dakota

(605) 773-3311

Alaska

(907) 465-2500

Idaho

(800) 377-3529

Michigan

(517) 636-6925

New York

(518) 485-2639

Tennessee

(615) 253-0600

Arizona

(602) 255-3381

Illinois

(217) 785-3707

Minnesota

(800) 657-3605

North Carolina

(877) 252-3052

Texas

(800) 252-5555

Arkansas

(501) 682-4775

Indiana

(317) 232-2240

Mississippi

(601) 359-1633

North Dakota

(701) 328-1241

Utah

(800) 662-4335

California

(916) 845-4669

Iowa

(800) 367-3388

Missouri

(573) 751-2836

Ohio

(855) 995-4422

Vermont

(802) 828-2865

Colorado

(303) 238-7378

Kansas

(785) 368-8222

Montana

(406) 444-6900

Oklahoma

(405) 521-3160

Virginia

(804) 367-8037

Connecticut

(860) 509-6000

Kentucky

(502) 564-2694

Nebraska

(402) 471-4079

Oregon

(844) 469-5512

Washington

(360) 705-6705

Delaware

(302) 739-3073

Louisiana

(855) 307-3893

Nevada

(775) 684-5708

Pennsylvania

(833) 722-6778

West Virginia

(866) 767-8683

Florida

(850) 488-6800

Maine

(207) 624-9670

New Hampshire

(603) 230-5000

Rhode Island

(401) 574-8484

Wisconsin

(608) 266-2776

Georgia

(877) 423-6711

Maryland

(410) 260-7314

New Jersey

(609) 292-6400

South Carolina

(844) 898-8542

Wyoming

(307) 777-5200

 

What’s next?

Be sure to tell the IRS and other tax agencies your plans to close your business. Then, work through the other essential steps you’ll need to take to complete the process. These include informing your employees about your planned closure, recovering outstanding accounts receivable, settling up with creditors, filing final taxes, and canceling plans and benefits.

The list is long, but we can help you work through it. Log into your owner’s portal to attain a list of the actions you’ll need to take to complete the closure of your business.

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